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Posts by CAMH

As the clocks fall back, plan ahead

SAD-blog

By CAMH with thanks to Dr. Robert Levitan

This Sunday marks the end of Daylight Savings Time, and most Canadians will set back their clocks by an hour as we get ready for the shorter days of winter. For many, the change in time can be beneficial – we’re gifted an extra hour to catch up on sleep after a busy fall cleanup or some raucous Halloween parties.

However, it also signals shorter days are on their way, which becomes problematic for those who are susceptible to Seasonal Affective Disorder. Approximately 2-5% of the population will become severely affected by seasonal depression, while another 10-15% will experience a milder form, and a larger part of the population will feel a mild sense of unease in the form of winter blues.

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Building Mental Health Capacity Worldwide

globalimpact-CAMH

By Sireesha Bobbili, Special Advisor / Project Coordinator, Office of Transformative Global Health, Social & Epidemiological Research, CAMH

Did you know that CAMH has an office dedicated to global mental health?

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Trauma and Tragedy

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Image courtesy of ErasingScott on Flickr

by Dr. Donna Ferguson, Psychologist with the WSIB Psychological Trauma Program

In the wake of tragic events such as last week’s shooting in Ottawa, many unanswered questions have arisen about the role that mental illness played, if any, in this attack. What I would like to discuss today is something different—the impact that such a traumatic event can have on others, including people we may know or work with.

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‘Selfree’ – The Freedom to be Me

Selfree CAMHblog

Deryn Duesbery,Yasmine Gray, Malindu Danthanarayana, and Finola Dsouza blog about their own experiences with self-image, mental health, and the powerful new campaign from NYAC, #Selfree

I had this really weird moment back in high school when I found myself identifying with Jekyll and Hyde. There was me – happy, sixteen, doing well in school, dating a cute boy. And then there was the me that didn’t really feel like me at all – moody, distant, and always just so freaking tired. That other me could barely do anything but stay in bed all day and ignore my phone, emerging from my room after eight hours of Netflix to snap at my sister and manipulate my way out of eating a full meal. But that wasn’t a part of me I let everyone see. That wasn’t a part of me I let anyone see, actually. Image is not always reality.

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Engaging in the Next Big Breakthroughs with CAMH

Breakthrough-Challenge-BlogMorgan Barense, Associate Professor and Canada Research Chair in Cognitive Neuroscience at the University of Toronto and Co-Chair of CAMH Engage, blogs on the Breakthrough Challenge, a research-inspired event in support of CAMH Foundation on November 6.

Morgan Barense

Morgan Barense

As a scientist, I’m always excited to hear about the next big breakthrough – a discovery that will change the way we look at a disease or a new treatment that will change lives of patients. Through their commitment to discovery, CAMH is inspiring hope in millions of Canadians who suffer from mental illness and addiction.

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