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Posts from the ‘Health Equity’ Category

The mental health of young people of South Asian origin – a neglected group in Toronto.

141114-Blog3By Gursharan Virdee, Research Analyst, Schizophrenia Division, Complex Mental Illness Program at CAMH

Toronto, the cultural mosaic, provides for a rich and diverse community life. A significant proportion of Toronto’s residents are immigrants, with 12% identifying as South Asian, 11% as Chinese and 9% as African Caribbean (City of Toronto, 2013). For some this is an environment which provides everything needed to thrive, but sadly a significant number are excluded and overlooked from these resources.

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Youth Speak Out on Engagement

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The Northwest Toronto Service Collaborative is a group of service providers and community memberswho are finding ways to improve services for children, youth and families with mental health and addictions needs in North York and City of York.

“The meaningful engagement of individuals with lived experience changes everything. True or false?”

That is the question that was asked of four members of the Northwest Toronto Service Collaborative’s Youth Advisory Group.

These young people have been offering their input into a systems change initiative in North York and City of York called Peer Positive. This initiative is working to support community service providers to engage ‘peers’ as equal partners in the design, delivery, and review of services.

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Building Mental Health Capacity Worldwide

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By Sireesha Bobbili, Special Advisor / Project Coordinator, Office of Transformative Global Health, Social & Epidemiological Research, CAMH

Did you know that CAMH has an office dedicated to global mental health?

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Trauma and Tragedy

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Image courtesy of ErasingScott on Flickr

by Dr. Donna Ferguson, Psychologist with the WSIB Psychological Trauma Program

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Dr. Donna Ferguson

In the wake of tragic events such as last week’s shooting in Ottawa, many unanswered questions have arisen about the role that mental illness played, if any, in this attack. What I would like to discuss today is something different—the impact that such a traumatic event can have on others, including people we may know or work with.

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Escaping violence, finding treatment for trauma

by Donna Ferguson, Psychologist with the WSIB Psychological Trauma Program

Canada is a safe haven for so many refugees fleeing violence or persecution in their home countries, but these victims of trauma often cannot escape the nightmares and haunting memories they bring with them.

Whether they have escaped civil conflict or genocide, these clients who have been traumatized can often be embarrassed because it is not something discussed in their culture. For example, in the Caribbean, the stigma and shame connected with mental illness means people feel they are not allowed to complain, not allowed to seek help because coming forward means shame on you and shame on your family.

The reality is when you don’t have support – either social or familial support – and you leave post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) untreated, it can lead to other mental health problems or addiction issues.

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