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Posts from the ‘Research & Innovation’ Category

Taking Back “Experimentation”

PSSP Innovation

Northwest Toronto Service Collaborative’s Design Jam

By Josina Vink for the CAMH Blog

It’s time to reclaim experimentation to enable people-powered innovation in mental health.

Mental health systems in Canada have a dark history with experimentation. In the 20th century, we tested some horrific therapies on people with “mental disorders” including hydrotherapy, insulin coma, and the medical surgery of lobotomy.  Because of the legacy of these tests and studies, there is some resistance to experimentation in the context of mental health today. Read more

Promoting Collaborative Mental Health Online

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By Michael-Jane Levitan, Special Advisor, Office of Transformative Global Health

Collaborative mental health seems self-explanatory. It suggests that work surrounding mental health be a collective effort with varied perspectives and diverse skill sets to improve the quality of care for clients. While this is very true, it’s often easier said than done. Read more

Inspiring Moments

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By Dr. Bruce Pollock, Vice President of Research at CAMH

Every so often, we all experience moments that inspire us, that show us how our efforts fit into a broader perspective.

We had such a moment at our CAMH Campbell Family Mental Health Research Symposium in November. We were honoured with the presence of 2000 Nobel Laureate Dr. Arvid Carlsson. Read more

Cell Phones and Mobile Apps: The Answer for Addressing Psychosis in Tanzania?

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By Sireesha Bobbili, Special Advisor / Project Coordinator, Office of Transformative Global Health, Social & Epidemiological Research, CAMH

CAMH is well underway on an exciting new initiative in rural Tanzania with the potential to influence the impact of psychosis, a condition that affects approximately 3.9% of the population. Read more

Using videogames to raise awareness of healthy and harmful gaming

soulcrush - blogThe Problem Gambling Institute of Ontario at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health brings treatment professionals and leading researchers together with experts in communicating and sharing knowledge.

Anya has tried every tactic to get her 18 year old son to cut down his video gaming. She has taken away internet access, grounded him and even tried bribing him into doing other activities.  “Peter comes home from school, throws his backpack on the ground and does not come out of his room for hours” she explains. “I can’t even get him to come out for dinner most nights”. When Peter was in high school, Anya connected with her son’s school teachers and school appointed social workers desperately looking for ways to help her son. His grades were slipping, and she was blaming the video games. Now that Peter is in college, he often stays up until 2 or 3 am gaming and browsing the internet and sometimes misses his morning classes. When he’s not playing Counter-Strike, he is watching online videos of people playing. Read more

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