Skip to content

Posts from the ‘Research & Innovation’ Category

Using videogames to raise awareness of healthy and harmful gaming

soulcrush - blogThe Problem Gambling Institute of Ontario at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health brings treatment professionals and leading researchers together with experts in communicating and sharing knowledge.

Anya has tried every tactic to get her 18 year old son to cut down his video gaming. She has taken away internet access, grounded him and even tried bribing him into doing other activities.  “Peter comes home from school, throws his backpack on the ground and does not come out of his room for hours” she explains. “I can’t even get him to come out for dinner most nights”. When Peter was in high school, Anya connected with her son’s school teachers and school appointed social workers desperately looking for ways to help her son. His grades were slipping, and she was blaming the video games. Now that Peter is in college, he often stays up until 2 or 3 am gaming and browsing the internet and sometimes misses his morning classes. When he’s not playing Counter-Strike, he is watching online videos of people playing. Read more

Young and bisexual? Study highlights need for more support

by Margaret Robinson, Mi’kmaq feminist scholar working on LGBTQ issues in health

visualization of social network from study

This beautiful L-word-like diagram shows the recruitment pattern for our Risk & Resilience study on “bi” mental health.

When it comes to LGBTQ health issues, bisexual people are frequently overlooked. Too often, bisexuality is dismissed as a phase or trend, and programs designed for gay, lesbian, or trans youth may not provide the support and mentorship that bisexual youth need.

A study by the CAMH Re:searching for LGBTQ Health team raises important questions about how we understand and support bisexual youth.

Our team surveyed 405 bisexual-identified people across Ontario, and compared the data about young people (between age 16 and 24) with adults (25 and older).

See: Mental Health and Substance Use among Bisexual Youth and Non-Youth in Ontario, Canada

Read more

Be Safe app for youth: A community creating change

by Erin Schulthies

BeSafe

Be Safe was first developed for young people in London Ontario, to help them navigate the mental health system. If you’re interested in adapting for your city, contact mindyourmind

On April 1st, the London branch of the Systems Improvement through Service Collaboratives launched the Be Safe app, a tool to help youth in crisis.

With both a smartphone version and a printable paper pocket guide (pdf), it is versatile for both young people and their mental health care providers.

I should know. After 13 years in London’s mental health care system, knowing the essentials of my needs in crisis is key to weathering my storms.

The Be Safe app helps me keep my personal information close at hand and helps me choose where to turn should I need extra support.

I am proud to say that I was part of the team that developed this app from the beginning, along with other youth with lived experience. Read more

The future is here: My experience with personalized medicine

by Larry Meikle

Larry

Larry

My name is Larry Meikle. I’m a retired Ontario civil servant and a student in the University of King’s College Master of Fine Arts program in Creative Nonfiction Writing, where I’m in the process of writing my first book.

This past year I’ve felt better than I have for decades. I would not be a graduate student today if I were feeling the way I did even a year ago, had I not participated in CAMH’s IMPACT study on mental health problems and DNA.

I was diagnosed with clinical depression in 1997 and since then I’ve been taking antidepressants, with some degree of success. I tried going off my meds on a couple of occasions in the hope I could battle depression without them, but came to the painful realization I couldn’t.

A couple of years ago the antidepressant I had been taking for so many years suddenly stopped working for me. It “pooped out,” as the saying goes. My family doctor started me on a new medication, and that seemed to go reasonably well. Whenever I saw my doctor I’d tell him I was “getting by,” but anxiety was still a problem and I felt I could be doing much better.

Read more

Exploring the future of mental health services

by Josina Vink, Regional Implementation Coordinator, GTA Region, Provincial System Support Program

What might we find in our bathroom cabinets in 2034?

What could the future of mental health services look like?

What does it mean to invest in future-oriented health innovation?

These are the questions explored by 40 service providers, innovators and individuals with lived experience of mental health needs at a session hosted by MaRS and CAMH on May 23rd.

Chris McCarthy, innovation lead at Kaiser Permanente, opened up the afternoon with a demonstration of the value and process of establishing innovation capacity within healthcare settings, exemplified by the development of Kaiser’s Innovation Consultancy.

The discussion with Chris was followed by a hands-on workshop to test out an emerging innovation method to explore the future of mental health.

Read more

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 191 other followers