Skip to content

Posts from the ‘Social Change’ Category

A Beautiful Mind

John-Nash-600x300

By Dr. Sean Kidd, Head of the Psychology Service of CAMH’s Schizophrenia Services and Assistant Professor with the University of Toronto Department of Psychiatry

This past Saturday the brilliant mathematician Dr. John Nash and his wife were killed in a car accident on the New Jersey turnpike. Dr. Nash was 86 years old. His work in mathematics was internationally recognized, earning him prestigious awards such as the Nobel and Abel prizes. Despite such accomplishments, he is far better known as the inspiration for the Sylvia Nasar biography ‘A Beautiful Mind’ and the 2001 film of the same name starring Russell Crowe.

This film, inspired by his life, stands still as one of a very small number that has the experiences of schizophrenia as a primary focus. Read more

True Colors Shine Through at The White House

Alex-Whitehouse-blog

By Dr. Alex Abramovich, Postdoctoral Fellow, Social & Epidemiological Research Department

The True Colors Fund in New York City, co-founded by Cyndi Lauper, works towards ending LGBTQ youth homelessness. My colleagues at the True Colors Fund have persistently tried to reauthorize the Runaway and Homeless Youth Act, America’s only Federal law that funds services for youth experiencing homelessness, they have also worked hard to ensure that the Act recognizes the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, questioning, and two-spirit (LGBTQ2S) youth. Read more

Stigma – Overcoming that last taboo

stigma-wordle2

By Elizabeth Scott, an independent, Toronto-based writer and editor

I know what stigma feels like – frustrating, maddening, depressing. There really are no positive words to describe its impact on people and families that deal with mental health concerns.

I’ve pushed through stigma’s oppression on many occasions. Like an ugly shawl, stigma feels like a shroud, something embarrassing; a disgrace. It’s an awful word that evokes awful responses that are often based on misinformation and myth. Its effects are a modern day tragedy. Read more

Changing the Face of Boys and Men’s Mental Health in First Nations Communities

ksp-logo-blog

By Dr. Julie George, a member of Kettle & Stony Point First Nation (KSPFN), Project Scientist in CAMH’s Social and Epidemiological Research Department and the Mental Health, Addiction and Violence Support Program Manager at the Health Services Department in her home community.

As a member of Kettle & Stony Point First Nation and as a service provider, I am witness to the mental health challenges that boys and men face.

As a researcher, I am also part of an innovative new project to address these challenges, a project that is part of a paradigm shift in Aboriginal research and program development. This new approach directly involves Aboriginal people in defining problems, conducting research, and facilitating solutions. Read more

Mental Illness and ‘Community’: Oft used, seldom defined, and poorly understood

Community-MI2By Dr. Sean Kidd, Head of the Psychology Service of CAMH’s Schizophrenia Services and Assistant Professor with the University of Toronto Department of Psychiatry

The term “community” is a central concept in mental health reform and recovery conversations. These ideas are repeatedly referenced in documents such as the World Health Organization Mental Health Action Plan and the Canadian Mental Health Strategy. Clinicians routinely reference clients “getting back into the community”, and people affected by mental illness will often discuss being involved in a range of communities as key to the process of recovery. Read more

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 280 other followers