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Inspiring Moments

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By Dr. Bruce Pollock, Vice President of Research at CAMH

Every so often, we all experience moments that inspire us, that show us how our efforts fit into a broader perspective.

We had such a moment at our CAMH Campbell Family Mental Health Research Symposium in November. We were honoured with the presence of 2000 Nobel Laureate Dr. Arvid Carlsson. Read more

Understanding mental illness and violence

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By Dr. Sandy Simpson, Chief of Forensic Psychiatry at CAMH

Dr. Sandy SimpsonThere are few issues so misleadingly linked in the public mind as mental illness and violence.

The best efforts of Hollywood, and the media’s tendency to conflate risk and illness in the context of mass shootings in the USA , leaves the public reasonably thinking that people with mental illness present a major risk to the public. They don’t, but this seems counter-intuitive to the public because of all the media images.

So what are the facts? Is there a relationship between mental illness and violence? Read more

Cell Phones and Mobile Apps: The Answer for Addressing Psychosis in Tanzania?

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By Sireesha Bobbili, Special Advisor / Project Coordinator, Office of Transformative Global Health, Social & Epidemiological Research, CAMH

CAMH is well underway on an exciting new initiative in rural Tanzania with the potential to influence the impact of psychosis, a condition that affects approximately 3.9% of the population. Read more

Teach them well and let them lead the way

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Earlier this month, CAMH was host to a group of 30 grade 9 students as part of the national Take Our Kids to Work Day program – an initiative that has been a long-standing tradition at CAMH for over a decade.

Those young enough to have attended their own Take Our Kids to Work day in the past might remember that awkward day of missing school to visit a parent’s office, potentially job shadowing a staff member, and for the unlucky ones, actually doing office work answering phones or organizing files.

Things are a bit different at CAMH – recently billed as one of Canada’s Top 100 employers – which offered a full day of activities for its young guests. Read more

Off-ward passes in the Forensic Mental Health System – A misunderstood privilege and rehabilitation tool

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By Dr. Sandy Simpson, Chief of Forensic Psychiatry at CAMH

Dr. Sandy SimpsonForensic patients are people who, because they are unwell, have committed an offence. Because their mental illness caused the offence they are sent to a hospital – not prison – to get treatment and rehabilitation for the causes of their offending. This process of recovery is a slow and careful one, overseen by the Ontario Review Board.

Initially, most patients are confined to secure hospital wards while staff work with them to understand their illness, their treatment needs and to develop a rehabilitation and recovery plan in accordance with their Review Board disposition. During this time, staff members also determine the potential risk the patient has to others, as well as to themselves. Once this is achieved, a gradual plan for increasing privileges is put in place so the person may attend treatment opportunities available off the ward. This may also include passes for recreation and socialization opportunities. Read more

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